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Homework: New Research Suggests It May Be an Unnecessary Evil

The Case for Homework

❶Independent reading; thoughtful writing; research projects.

Essay title: Is Homework Helpful or Harmful to Students

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The Case Against Homework
NEA Reviews of the Research on Best Practices in Education

According to some studies in rats, it can inhibit a fat producing enzyme called Citrate Lyase, making it more difficult for the body to produce fat out of carbohydrates (1). Other rat studies show increased levels of the neurotransmitter serotonin. This could theoretically lead to reduced appetite and cravings (2). There are actually a whole bunch of studies in rats showing that Garcinia Cambogia consistently leads to significant weight loss (3, 4, 5, 6).

However, what works in rats doesnt always work in humans.

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Research doesn't have all the answers, but a review of some existing data yields some helpful observations and guidance. How Much Homework Do Students Do? Survey data and anecdotal evidence show that some students spend hours nightly doing homework.

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It’s important to remember that some people object to homework for reasons that aren’t related to the dispute about whether research might show that homework provides academic benefits.

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Help Customer Service eliminating traditional homework assignments in favor of family time. The change was quickly met with outrage from some parents, though it earned support from other. Is homework harmful or helpful? Education experts and parents weigh in. Topics To Do Connect. Edit Module “Homework is important because it’s an opportunity for students to review materials that are covered in the classroom. Kohn points out that no research has ever found any advantage to assigning homework — of any kind or in any.

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Even when homework is helpful, there can be too much of a good thing. "There is a limit to how much kids can benefit from home study," Cooper says. He agrees with an oft-cited rule of thumb that students should do no more than 10 minutes a night per grade level — from about 10 minutes in first grade up to a maximum of about two hours in high. Research suggests that while homework can be an effective learning tool, assigning too much can lower student performance and interfere with other important activities.