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The host range of a virus is determined by

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Merge this question into. Split and merge into it. In Microbiology , Genetics , Viruses biological. The proteins on its surface and that of the host. What does the virus reproduction do to the host bacterium? What is a process that a virus can do in a host? First the virus enters the host cell, then the virus' hereditary material come, then the host cells hereditary material becomes viral, then the host cell expands, and then it POPS!!! How does a virus affect a host cell?

When a typical virus infects a host cell, the latter ultimatelydies. The virus first enters the host cell and then uses the cell'sorganelles to replicate itself. Eventually the host cell ruptures,spilling new viruses into the host's bloodstream.

However, thereare some viruses that don't kill their host cells. What is the host range of Ebola virus? As far as we know, Ebola attacks mostly primates. There is some indication that it may also attack the Afrtican Fruit Bat and by inference, other mammals as well. Some variants of Ebola, notably Ebola reston, were lethal to monkeys but apparently infected humans although -- in humans -- it remained asymptomatic..

Bear in mind that we suspect Ebola has been misdiagnosed quite often, as its symptomology is very similar to many other disorders indigenous to Ebola locale. How does a virus recognize its host? Numbers may be used to distingush among similar viruses that infect the same host. What host range for chickenpox? Chicken pox affects the man only.

Most probably it does not affect the primates or other animals. What is the host range for Assuming the subnet mask is You range of total addresses is from The first address, The last address, Thus, the host range is from How is a virus cause a disease in a host?

A Host is living thing that a virus or parasite lives on or in. Using a host's cell as a tiny factory , the virus forces the host to make viruses rather than healthy new cells. How does a virus attach to a host cell? Does a virus need a host to live? The simple answer to this question is "no", but as usual in medicine, there are no simple answers. First, we must understand that viruses are not "alive" in any traditional sense. They are basically little packages of DNA or RNA the instruction codes for life that require a host cell to be able to begin behaving in a life-like way producing proteins and exerting influence on the world around them.

So in this sense, a virus most definitely needs a host to truly live. Perhaps a better question or at least a different one might be "does a virus necessarily need a host to survive "? The answer to this question is a fairly definite "no". Some viruses outside the body can survive for hours, even days, on inanimate objects, waiting for another host to pick them up and become infected with them. This is the case with Rhinovirus, a common cause of the common cold.

On the other hand, some viruses like HIV can survive only a very short time outside their human hosts - sometimes only seconds or minutes. So in conclusion, a virus definitely requires a host to carry out its life mission of reproducing itself and producing disease, but does not require a host necessarily to survive. How does a virus sustain life in its host?

First things first a virus is not living. The virus injects its Genetic material G. Why does a virus need a host? Because virus has only one genetic material i. So it has to depend on host's cell for anyone of the genetic material which it lacks. How does a virus attatch to a host cell? It doesn't exactly attach to it, it kind of invades the other cell. Think of the virus eating the host. How do you determine the range? Why does a virus need the host cell?

Viruses do not have the capability to reproduce. They infect a hostcell and hijack the host cell's reproductive faculty, creating moreviruses. Does a virus need a host cell? Without a host cell a virus can not replicate, so, yes, a virus needs a host cell.

How does a virus recognize its host cell? Examples include animals playing host to parasitic worms e. More specifically in botany , a host plant supplies food resources to micropredators, which have an evolutionarily stable relationship with their hosts similar to ectoparasitism. The host range is the collection of hosts that an organism can use as a partner. Symbiosis spans a wide variety of possible relationships between organisms, differing in their permanence and their effects on the two parties.

If one of the partners in an association is much larger than the other, it is generally known as the host. Most parasites are only parasitic for part of their life cycle. By comparing parasites with their closest free-living relatives, parasitism has been shown to have evolved on at least separate occasions. Some organisms live in close association with a host and only become parasitic when environmental conditions deteriorate.

A parasite may have a long term relationship with its host, as is the case with all endoparasites. The guest seeks out the host and obtains food or another service from it, but does not usually kill it.

Generally the host is kept alive until the parasitoid is fully grown and ready to pass on to its next life stage. Another possibility is that the host-guest relationship may have no permanent physical contact, as in the brood parasitism of the cuckoo. Parasites follow a wide variety of evolutionary strategies, placing their hosts in an equally wide range of relationships.

A definitive or primary host is one in which a parasite reaches maturity and reproduces sexually. An intermediate host is one in which the parasite does not do this. A virus is an obligate parasite, acting as a living thing only to the extent that when it is in a host cell , the machinery of that cell makes copies of the virus. A single reservoir host may be reinfected several times. A secondary or intermediate host harbors a parasite only for a short transition period, during which usually some developmental stage is completed.

For trypanosomes , the cause of sleeping sickness , strictly, humans are the secondary host, while the tsetse fly is the primary host, given that it has been shown that reproduction occurs in the insect. It is not always easy or even possible to identify which host is definitive and which secondary. As the life cycles of many parasites are not well understood, sometimes the subjectively more important organism is arbitrarily labelled as definitive, and this designation may continue even after it is found to be incorrect.

For example, sludge worms are sometimes considered "intermediate hosts" for salmonid whirling disease , even though the myxosporean parasite reproduces sexually inside them.

A paratenic host is similar to an intermediate host, except that it is not needed for the parasite's development cycle to progress. Paratenic hosts serve as "dumps" for non-mature stages of a parasite in which they can accumulate in high numbers. The trematode Alaria americana may serve as an example: The tadpoles are more frequently preyed on by snakes , in which the mesocercariae may not undergo further development.

However, the parasites may accumulate in the snake paratenic host and infect the definitive host once the snake is consumed by a canid. A dead-end or incidental host is an intermediate host that generally does not allow transmission to the definitive host, thereby preventing the parasite from completing its development.

For example, humans and horses are dead-end hosts for West Nile virus , whose life-cycle is normally between culicine mosquitoes and birds. Micropredation is an evolutionarily stable strategy within parasitism, in which a small predator lives parasitically on a much larger host plant, eating parts of it. The range of plants on which a herbivorous insect feeds is known as its host range. Perhaps a better question or at least a different one might be "does a virus necessarily need a host to survive "?

The answer to this question is a fairly definite "no". Some viruses outside the body can survive for hours, even days, on inanimate objects, waiting for another host to pick them up and become infected with them. This is the case with Rhinovirus, a common cause of the common cold. On the other hand, some viruses like HIV can survive only a very short time outside their human hosts - sometimes only seconds or minutes.

So in conclusion, a virus definitely requires a host to carry out its life mission of reproducing itself and producing disease, but does not require a host necessarily to survive. How does a virus sustain life in its host? First things first a virus is not living. The virus injects its Genetic material G. Why does a virus need a host? Because virus has only one genetic material i. So it has to depend on host's cell for anyone of the genetic material which it lacks.

How does a virus attatch to a host cell? It doesn't exactly attach to it, it kind of invades the other cell. Think of the virus eating the host. How do you determine the range? Why does a virus need the host cell? Viruses do not have the capability to reproduce.

They infect a hostcell and hijack the host cell's reproductive faculty, creating moreviruses. Does a virus need a host cell? Without a host cell a virus can not replicate, so, yes, a virus needs a host cell.

How does a virus recognize its host cell? Proteins on the surface of a virus attach to the receptors on the cell membrane of the host cell. After a virus attaches to the host what does in inject into the host? For more information on this process, you might want to look up the Lysogenic Cycle. The host range of a virus is determined by? A virus consists of a nucleic acid surrounded by a protein coat. In some cases, a membrnous envelope. How can a virus be helpful to a host?

A virus can help its host by destroying a bacterium, fungi, or other foreign body that harms the host leaving the host itself unscathed. This creates a symbiotic relationship between the host and the virus. This may sound improbable, but viruses normally can only target one species and then only one type of cell of that particular species, allowing for this. In fact, the use of viruses to combat bacteria was attempted in a toothpaste a number of years ago, but was unsuccessful mainly because the manufacturers failed to convince enough people that viruses could actually be good for them.

Use 2 bits to determine the subnet mask to make the host range? If you are borrowing 2 bits, then the subnet masks will look like: What is the aim for a host cell for a virus? A virally infected host cells' "desire" would be to create copies of the virus as that is what the virus does to its host cell - turn its own mechanisms against itself. The host cell, once infected, can not do much to stop the spread of the virus internally. The external immune response would be to target that cell with antibodies and then have white blood cells phagocytize that cell to stop the spread of the virus anymore same with free-floating viruses outside of cells.

What does a virus do after leaving a host cell? After leaving the host cell, the virus goes to insert its DNA into even more cells. After a while, there are thousands of cells with the DNA of the virus. With that DNA, the cells make more viruses.

There are two cycles for this; Lytic and Lysogenic. How does a virus destroy the host cell's DNA? A virus doesn't destroy the host cell's DNA.

The virus depends onthe cell's DNA to keep the cell functioning while the virusreproduces. The viruses that actually kill the cell only destroythe DNA indirectly. Once the structure of the cell is broken up inthe process of death the DNA is exposed to the environment andbreaks up also. However some viruses keep the cell alive and justbud off of it without killing it.

A few viruses actually "hide" inthe cell's DNA and get reproduced with it when the cell divides. Host specificity of a virus is due to?

Host specificity of a virus can be attributed to a few different factors. One of these factors is a viral species ability to "hijack" a cells internal machinery and cause it to reproduce the genetic makeup and proteins which make it up. Many viruses then exit the cell usually through destroying it and may take a part of the cell's membrane with them as a sort of phospholipid coat.

This membrane has all of the identifying proteins which enable our cells to recognize one another and serves viruses in the same manner. How does a virus use its host cell to reproduce?

Virus took out the control of the machinery of the host cell to replicate themselves when they infect a cell. How does a virus kill its host cell?

Host Range

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Host range is determined by _____ the specific attachment site on the host cell's surface and the availability of host cellular factors. Viral size is ascertained by __________ microscopy.

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The host range of the virus will depend upon the presence of the receptors described above. If a host lacks the receptor for a virus, or if the host cell lacks some component necessary for the replication of a virus, the host will inherently be resistant to that virus.

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The host range of a virus is determined by a. the proteins on its surface and that of the host b. whether its nucleic acid is DNA or RNA c. the enzymes carried by the virus%(2). It all depends on what you mean by your question. Both the host cell and the virus have proteins that must match for the virus to enter the cell. The more these match, the gre ater number of species of plants and animals that will be affected.

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The host range is the set of hosts that a parasite can use as a partner. In the case of human parasites, the host range influences the epidemiology of the parasitism or disease. For instance, the production of antigenic shifts in Influenza A virus can result from pigs being infected with the virus from several different hosts (such as human and bird). specific host attachment sites and cellular factors necessary for viral multiplication.